Story | telling

Georgia came unexpectedly into my life.
No, I’m not talking about a girl, neither about the north-american state.
This is Georgia, a country located in between Europe and Asia, in the Caucasus region. Its capital and biggest city is Tbilisi.

Georgia came with a purpose: to participate in an Erasmus+ Training Course named “Sharing Stories, Building Bridges”, supported by European Commission’s Erasmus+ program. The main goal of the project is to teach youngsters how to use the method of digital storytelling, in order to express their personal stories using digital media.

Georgia came at the last minute: only a week ahead of the beginning of the training course I got my acceptance letter.

TK

Backpack ready with my winter gear (thanks to my time in Lithuania!), two Turkish Airlines’ flights later and four time zones ahead of Portugal, I arrived in Tbilisi. A cool, wintry breeze welcomed me in Georgia. I was actually looking forward to that.

Soon I ended up meeting some of the fellow colleagues that would accompany me through this storytelling journey. In total, I met 26 participants from the following countries: Armenia, Bulgaria, Denmark, Georgia, Germany, Moldova, Poland, Portugal, Russia and Ukraine.

As usual with training courses, the first day was meant for participants to get to know each other better through a series of ice-breaking and team building activities. After all, we were going to spend almost a whole week together, both during the actual work hours as well as during leisure time. We also had the chance to explore the village of Bakuriani, where we were settled, and meet with some locals.

Stream

Over the next 7 days we had the chance to immerse ourselves in the methodology known as digital storytelling, with the help of Signe, Dorthe and Kasia, our facilitators. The first handful of days were dedicated to the creation of our own individual stories, where we had to put our skills and imagination to work.

“To be a person is to have a story to tell”

The sentence above sums up what storytelling means. At least for me. We can just be normal people (what is normal anyways?), living the normal life, and still having amazing stories to tell. Even if sharing the stories with the outside world can be important, the storytelling process allows us to reflect on personal moments of change.

The concept of digital storytelling is subdivided in the following components:

  1. Script writing
  2. Voice recording
  3. Media gathering (visuals)
  4. Video editing
  5. Screening

Stories are meant to be authentic and personal, so before we plunged on the script writing part, we were offered some creative writing exercises to (you guessed it!) exercise our brains.
Once we had an idea of the story we wanted to tell, we followed to the scrip writing part, in which the only guidelines we had was not to make it longer than 250 words.

One might think that this is a very lonesome method, but the truth is that along the way, we gather in small groups, aka story-circles, where we have a safe space to share our writings and the problems we might be facing during the process. Moreover, we are assigned a buddy, with whom we can further discuss and collaborate. All in all, we are not meant to be left in the wilderness alone.

When I came to Georgia I had zero ideas on the story I wanted to tell. I just tried not to create any expectations and go with the flow. The idea came organically has conversations took place with my fellow colleagues. Script writing was a breeze, unlike the voice recording part. Eventually I managed to succeed, not without a huge help from Signe, who lend me her quiet room. Visuals soon followed and before I knew it, time was running so fast that for some moment I thought I would not be able to finish my film in time for the screening!

I wanted to pay homage to those people I had met in Lithuania, especially the ones who took their time to knit such a beautiful, warm and cosy scarf. I wish I had more opportunities to wear it however, cause you know… Portugal is a bit too warm for that.

Once we finished our screening session, not without getting a bit emotional, we were rewarded with an afternoon trip to one of the most famous castles in Georgia: the Rabati Castle. A Georgian traditional dinner was also one of the perks we got afterwards. With endless toasts.

Back to the mountains, for the second part of the project, we went through various sessions aimed at preparing us, the participants, to become digital storytelling facilitators back in our countries. We also had the opportunity to better understand the method behind the digital storytelling.

In my opinion it was very smart to first have the opportunity of creating our own stories and only afterwards explores the theoretical side of it, as not to overwhelm us with rigid ideas and workflows. We were able to discover the process mostly by ourselves, subtly guided by our facilitators.

And the time in Bakuriani could not be complete without some horse-riding time. For as little as 5 Lari.

Riding

Now is the time to replicate what we learned! Soon a workshop on storytelling will take place in Portugal!

The Erasmus+ Training Course “Sharing Stories, Building Bridges” was made possible by Caucasus Youth Nexus, MasterPeace Georgia and Digital StoryLab.


When we were back in the capital, I still had two full days to enjoy myself and discover this city. Together with some of the people I had met during the training course.

Being in Georgia would incomplete if I would not talk (or write, in this case) about Ana, my Georgian psychologist/ballerina & friend, who was an EVS volunteer in Lithuania too! I have heard that “Love at first sight” happens, but in this case I’d reformulate the cliché to something like “Friendship at first sight”.

Being toured by a local, Ana, allowed me to go off the beaten path. Yes, I crossed the Bridge of Peace and went up the hill by cable-car to the Narikala fortress and Mother Of Georgia. But I also wandered around an historical area which, albeit in ruins, was incredibly charismatic.

Sausages

I was also presented with the opportunity to go with Ana to the school where she works as a psychologist to talk with some students about the opportunities of mobility that the European Commission offers and how it can have a positive impact in the lives of those who take part in these.

Endless

Acid Bar 4

Sure. Exactly.

Turkish Airlines

Time to say goodbye. And a promise to return.

მშვიდობით

Advertisements

ComICS @Cascais

ComICS PT
The final show

After the ComICS training course which took place in Latvia last January, the Portuguese group had the chance to finally show the world (or at least to the Lisboetas) the results of the work during those 10 snowy and incredibly cosy days in the Baltics.

How Lithuanians see Europe

How we (Lithuanians) see the rest of Europe

Internet never seizes to amaze me.

A couple of weeks ago I came across a 9gag post which showed Europe through the eyes of Lithuanians… The nicknames given can vary from author to author, but one that is transversal to all is Portugal.

Vilnius, what?!

Well, the 9gag community, in the comment section then provided with an explanation:

@user1
I’m from Lithuania and i can confirm that only 30% of this is true, the rest of it is complete bullshit and some of them doesn’t even make sense. And why the hell Portugal is named as Vilnius? Never heard or seen anywhere that any Lithuanian ever would call Portugal as Vilnius in any reference.
@user 2
no but Vilnius is called Portugal. That’s because Vilnius is on the very side of Lithuania just like Portugal is on the very side of Europe so many people from other cities in Lithuania call Vilnius people Portuguese. Although I have never been called that and I’ve been living here my whole life :’)

Totally unexpected, I would say… Have to confirm this with some Lithuanian folks!


On the 11th of March, 1990, Lithuania became the first country to proclaim itself independent from de Soviet Union, granting the country its second (and hopefully last) independence.

Happy 27th birthday! 🙂